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Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology
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CASE REPORT
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 24  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 405-409

Vogt-koyanagi-harada syndrome - A neurologist's perspective


1 Department of Neurology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Neuropathology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
3 Department of Neuroimaging and Interventional Radiology (NIIR), National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
4 Kashyap Eye Clinic, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Sanjib Sinha
Department of Neurology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Bengaluru, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aian.AIAN_405_20

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Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) syndrome is an immune-mediated granulomatous disease which affects melanin-rich organs like eyes, skin, nervous system, and ears. Neurological and auditory manifestations usually precede the involvement of other sites. Patients may manifest with “complete” or “incomplete” syndrome. We report two patients who presented with acute headache and impaired vision. Fundus examination revealed optic disc hyperemia and exudative retinal detachment which provided a clue for the diagnosis at the bedside. Fundus fluorescein angiogram (FFA) revealed abnormal dye leakage, whereas B scan showed choroid thickening. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis contrasted with unremarkable brain magnetic resonance imaging and lack of meningeal signs. Melanophagocytosis was evidenced by melanin-laden macrophages in CSF and skin biopsy. This finding is specific for VKH syndrome and helps to clinch the diagnosis even when the complete syndrome is not present cross-sectionally. VKH syndrome should be suspected in patients with aseptic meningitis if tests for common infectious and immune-mediated diseases are negative.


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