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Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 25  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 389-393

Peripheral neuropathy in children with chronic kidney disease: Are we looking enough?


1 Department of Pediatrics, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
2 Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Neurology Unit, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
3 Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Nephrology Unit, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Correspondence Address:
Arushi G Saini
Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Neurology Unit, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh - 160 012
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aian.aian_1067_21

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Background: Peripheral neuropathy in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is the most common neurological complication. We aimed to look at the prevalence and patterns of neuropathy in children with CKD. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted over 1 year in children with CKD, stage III and above. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) were performed as per standard protocols using surface electrodes on the muscles and by supramaximal stimulation of the corresponding nerves. Presence of electrophysiological abnormalities in the absence of clinical symptoms or signs was considered as subclinical neuropathy. Results: Nearly 45 children were evaluated. The majority were males (n = 39, 86.7%). The mean age was 7.9 ± 3 years (range 2–14). The mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at enrolment was 23.3 ± 14.6 mL/min/1.73 m2 (range 5–67). The majority of children were in stage III (n = 19, 42%), followed by stages V (n = 15, 33%) and IV (n = 11, 25%). There was no evidence of clinical neuropathy; 13 children (29%) showed subclinical neuropathy. All the nerves had an axonal pattern of involvement. Motor polyneuropathy was most common type of peripheral neuropathy. The commonest nerves involved were tibial and common peroneal nerves. There were no biochemical or clinical predictors of neuropathy in our cohort. Conclusion: The prevalence of subclinical neuropathy is high in children with CKD, stage III and above. Axonal motor polyneuropathy is the predominant pattern. Electrophysiological assessment of nerve function should be routinely done in children with advanced stages of CKD to prevent chronic complications.


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